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Due to COVID protection measures, our museum will  remain closed. As soon as new information is available, we will inform you.

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Tue–Thu 12:00–6:00 p.m.
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How to find us

FHXB Friedrichshain-Kreuzberg Museum
Adalbertstraße 95A
10999 Berlin-Kreuzberg
U-Bahn Kottbusser Tor (U1, U8), Bus M29, 140

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Wheelchair access to all exhibitions, the archive and the event floor. An accessible restroom is located on the basement level of the museum. You can retrieve the restroom key from the museum's bookstore (mezzanine level).

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The top floor of the Friedrichshain-Kreuzberg Museum can be rented for seminars, presentations, workshops, and film screenings.

Requests should be sent no later than 4 weeks before the desired date:
Tel. 030 50 58 52 46 or vermietungfhxb-museum.REMOVE-THIS.de

More information can be found here.

 

Contact

Bezirksamt Friedrichshain-Kreuzberg
Fachbereich Kultur und Geschichte

FHXB Friedrichshain-Kreuzberg Museum
Adalbertstraße 95A
10999 Berlin-Kreuzberg
Fax +49 30 50 58 52 58
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1988 – An Exhibit with the Photography of Ann-Christine Jansson and the Texts of Uwe Rada

April 12 – June 3, 2018

With the exhibit "1988", we invite you to travel back in time to a year often seen as a prologue to the momentous times of 1989 and the early nineties. The events in Berlin and Poland are its focus. In Poland, the Solidarność strikes and round-table discussions between the government and the opposition, and later the free elections of 1989, were well on their way. This was the start of a changing tide in Europe – one which would later lead to the fall of the Berlin Wall.

In Berlin, the year 1988 was characterized by countless clashes between the Berlin Senate and the city’s leftist-alternative scene. At the same time, a writers’ congress was held as part of the European Capital of Culture program, at which writers from East and West dreamed of a Europe without borders. In September 1988, the International Monetary Fund convened, a symbol then of that which we call globalization today. Tens of thousands of leftist demonstrators took to the streets to protest the IMF’s meeting.

The photographs of Ann-Christine Jansson and quotes from Uwe Radas novel 1988 reveal a world that seems entirely untouched by what is to happen just one year later. Everyday life, so banal in its strangeness, making you believe that this was the way it had always been – and would so remain.

Supported by funds from the district culture fund of Friedrichshain-Kreuzberg as part of the European Year of Cultural Heritage 2018.

Opening: 12 April 2018, 19:30

A catalog with the photographs of Ann-Christine Jansson accompanies the exhibit.

ISBN 978-3-935810-11-1