Opening Hours

You will need a negative, daily updated Covid-19 result from a testing center (self-testing is unfortunately not sufficient). An FFP2 protective mask must be worn when visiting the museum.

Exhibitions

Tue–Thu 12:00–6:00 p.m.
Fri–Sun 10:00 a.m.–8:00 p.m.
Admission free

Archive

Tue and Wed 10:00 a.m.–4:00 p.m.
Thu 12:00–6:00 p.m.

Office

Tue–Fr 10:00 a.m.–2:00 p.m.

How to find us

FHXB Friedrichshain-Kreuzberg Museum
Adalbertstraße 95A
10999 Berlin-Kreuzberg
U-Bahn Kottbusser Tor (U1, U8), Bus M29, 140

How to find us:

https://goo.gl/maps/vu8x9AQBR762

 

Accessibility

Wheelchair access to all exhibitions, the archive and the event floor. An accessible restroom is located on the basement level of the museum. You can retrieve the restroom key from the museum's bookstore (mezzanine level).

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Publications

Here you will find a list of our publications

 

Rental Space

The top floor of the Friedrichshain-Kreuzberg Museum can be rented for seminars, presentations, workshops, and film screenings.

Requests should be sent no later than 4 weeks before the desired date:
Tel. 030 50 58 52 46 or vermietungfhxb-museum.REMOVE-THIS.de

More information can be found here.

 

Contact

Bezirksamt Friedrichshain-Kreuzberg
Fachbereich Kultur und Geschichte

FHXB Friedrichshain-Kreuzberg Museum
Adalbertstraße 95A
10999 Berlin-Kreuzberg
Fax +49 30 50 58 52 58
infofhxb-museum.REMOVE-THIS.de

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Letters of Stone

June 28 – November 12, 2017

The Robinski family of Berlin sent over one-hundred letters to South Africa in the years between 1936 and 1943 – letters written to their emigrant sons, Herbert and Artur. They give an account of what everyday life was like for a Jewish family in Berlin, of increasing restrictions, of fear, but also of the hope that leaving Germany could still be possible. This hope would go unfulfilled; all the sons' efforts to rescue their family would fail: Cecilie and David Robinski, together with their daughters Edith and Hildegard and their son Siegfried and his wife, were deported and murdered. What remains are those letters sent to South Africa, which helped Steven Robins, one of the sons of Herbert Robinski, reconstruct his family’s story. In 2016, he published his findings with the book "Letters of Stone", in which he also draws connections between the racial ideology of the Nazis and the system of apartheid in South Africa. From 28 June to 12 November, these letters form the basis of an exhibit at the FHXB Museum.

Opening

Tuesday, 27 June, 19:00
FHXB Friedrichshain-Kreuzberg Museum, 2nd floor

Welcoming remarks

Clara Herrmann: District councilor for environment, culture, and continued education

Steven Robins: Author of the book "Letters of Stone – From Nazi Germany to South Africa"

Music: "duo nuevo sonido"

 

An exhibit of the FHXB Friedrichshain-Kreuzberg Museum, together with Steven Robins (author of the book "Letters of Stone", published 2016 by Penguin Random House). Supported by funds from the district cultural fund of Friedrichshain-Kreuzberg.